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How can I block porn on a mobile phone?

A few of the most common porn blockers are:
 
Mobicip
Net nanny
Covenant eyes
Xwatch
K9 Web Protection:
http://www1.k9webprotection.com/has a free IPhone app.

Covenant Eyes  is a web browser that monitors everything that the addicted person looks at then sends a report to his/ her accountability partner, i.e. sponsor, wife, pastor, etc.
 
With an iphone you will have to block Safari. After downloading Covenant Eyes do the following:
 
1.      Go to settings/general/restrictions
 
2.      Create a PIN (by someone other than the client) then block the use of safari,
         the ability to download apps, and set internet restrictions to block adult content.
 
3.      The only way the individual will be able to access porn will be to ask his/ her partner or
         whoever is assigned the pin.
 
If Facebook is a problem then you will need to delete the app. and set up restrictions (mentioned earlier) to not allow re-downloading of the app.

!!MOST WANTED LIST!!

As we, in the industry, continue to hear the diatribes of naysayers who maintain that sexually compulsive behaviours cannot become addictive behaviours; I challenge these few to attend the support meeting rooms full of men and women who have survived the ravages of sexually compulsive behaviour as an addiction.
 
I also challenge you who are reading this post and saying, "Yes", to step up to the plate and allow intensive therapy to guide you in breaking this menacing grip which your thoughts and behaviours have on you. It is one thing to read the information and commit to doing something about it soon. It is quite another thing to pick up your phone and make that first contact with a CSAT Therapist. Therapy will gently guide you to a self-understanding and determination to take control and master your thoughts and behaviours. Your hard work will open up possibilities you may not think are within your reach.
 
Please join me in a therapy session. Connect with others who have taken the first step and achieved freedom fro a personal bondage.

Treatment of offence and addiction

How is treatment different for the sex offender versus the sex addict?
 
Treatment for the sex offender is vastly different. Most Certified Sex Addiction Therapists have not received training in the specialized treatment of sex offenders. Sex offender behaviours, in addition to causing significant harms on victims, have severe legal consequences. A sex offender’s treatment involves deliberate, consistent, confrontational interventions on the part of the provider to break through harmful and resilient patterns of thoughts and behaviours which have become highly resistant to correction. Lack of self-awareness, insight, and conscience are typical characteristics of individuals classified as a sex offender.
 
Sex addiction therapists are trained to assess for the origins of historical sexual trauma in the individual resulting in conscionable and yet unwanted thoughts and behaviours in the present individuated self of the client. Treatment for the sex addict involves long-term (3 to 5 year) therapeutic interventions utilizing assessment, neurocognitive rehabilitation, and extensive inventory of destructive patterns of thoughts and behaviours through cognitive behavioural processing and restructuring.  Capacity or readiness for self-awareness, insight, and conscience are often characteristic of individuals classified as a sex addict.
 

Offender or Addict?

The question has recently been asked “What is the difference between sex addiction and sex offending?”
 
Sex offending is the methodical, unconscionable, intentional, or deliberate conveyance of behaviours from one person (perpetrator) upon another person (victim), animal, or object so as to violate social, legal, & cultural norms; an individual’s right to individuation and sexuality; and basic instinctive values. The acts or behaviours potentiate negative outcomes for the victim, perpetrator, family, and society.
 
Sex addiction often involves consensual and conscionable acting out behaviours. The outcomes of the behaviours are negative and are typically the byproduct of chronic and developmental neuronal brain changes resulting in characteristic impulsivity, restlessness, mood & personality changes, somatization disorders, significant losses in major life areas, including trauma response in the family members.
 
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